Project sleeper

Every shop needs a sweet ride for fetching parts and generally representing. This VW Bug is titled as a 1976, but has a hodgepodge of pre-1968 sheet metal. It is going to get bastardized further. Budget allowing, the goal is to have a normally aspirated, 12-second daily driver with about 180 HP (at the flywheel) and a fat torque curve. The larger purpose is to use this project to learn electronic engine management, and along the way reclaim this classic for 21st century use. It will have programmable, crank-fired ignition and port fuel injection with independent throttle bodies. Before any of that can get underway, there is a ton of rusted sheet metal  that needs to be cut out and replaced. When this project gets started in earnest, I will post a build thread here.
 

The blank canvas...

The blank canvas...

More work in progress

This is an aluminum hood scoop that I made at Lazze's shop, with his guidance. I would like to develop a steel version, to be welded into the deck lids of air cooled VWs for cold air intake, perhaps incorporating a NACA duct under the scoop. Under-the-apron turbo installations on Type 1 VWs generally draw from a single cone filter in the engine compartment. It shouldn't be too hard to route from a deck lid-mounted scoop to the turbo, which should drop intake air temperatures significantly (and look pretty boss).

Hood scoop in .063 aluminum

Work in progress

I am currently developing designs for gas tanks, CB 750 oil tanks, CB 750 air box covers, and tail sections. Pictured below is a first attempt at a steel gas tank half. To my eye it is a little too chopper-looking. I will be aiming for a cafe racer style tank (with knee pockets, like this one). John Ryland of Classified Moto has promised to let me borrow a classic Benelli tank, which I will use to make templates. 
 

Gas tank half, steel

Gas tank half, steel